Bikehangar is handed over to residents

Abby Hone, Principal Transport Planner, Brighton & Hove City Council with Frauke Behrendt, Project Leader, Smart e-bikes Research Project and Chris Sevink, Chair of the Ditchling Rise Area Residents Association

Abby Hone, Principal Transport Planner, Brighton & Hove City Council with Frauke Behrendt, Project Leader, Smart e-bikes Research Project and Chris Sevink, Chair of the Ditchling Rise Area Residents Association

Brighton’s first Bikehangar – an on-street lock up for bicycles – has been officially handed over to residents.

The University of Brighton-led project is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and Brighton and Hove City Council’s Local Sustainable Transport Fund (LSTF)*.

The hangar was formally presented on Tuesday, 9th September to the Ditchling Rise Area Residents Association (DRARA) which will manage the facility.

The hangar, on the corner of Ditchling Rise and Shaftesbury Road, is part of the university’s ‘smart e-bikes’ research project which is trialling and researching electrically-assisted cycles.

The ‘smart e-bikes’ research project, led by the University of Brighton between 2011 and 2014, is funded by the EPSRC. The aim of the project is to understand how people engage with smart e-cycling and the issues for policy, design/product development and research that could lead to a higher uptake of e-bikes in the UK, with the aim of reducing carbon emissions.

One of the Smart e-bikes Project's bikes by the Bikehangar on Shaftesbury Road

One of the Smart e-bikes Project’s bikes by the Bikehangar on Shaftesbury Road

Dr Frauke Behrendt, senior lecturer and leading the project at the university, said: “This trial enabled us to understand how the combination of an e-bike and sheltered cycle storage might encourage more people to take up cycling. The Bikehangar is of particular importance to those who do not have space to park their bike in or outside their own homes.”

The new hangar has six spaces available for rent by nearby residents.

Attending the handover were: Abby Hone, Principal Transport Planner, Brighton & Hove City Council; Chris Sevink, Chair of the Ditchling Rise Area Residents Association; and Frauke Behrendt, Project Leader, Smart e-bikes Research Project, University of Brighton.

* Further information on Brighton & Hove City Council’s LSTF project can be found here.

Response to OLEV call for evidence

Response to OLEV call for evidence on Government measures to support uptake of ultra low emission vehicles from 2015-2020

The Smart e-bikes Project research team: Sally Cairns (TRL and UCL), Frauke Behrendt (University of Brighton) and David Raffo (University of Ulster) with specialist advice from Andy Cope (Sustrans) and Lynn Sloman (Transport for Quality of Life) made a response to the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV)’s call.

The team’s overall contention is that OLEV should make electrically-assisted bikes a priority component of their 2015-2020 programme, and support their uptake in a number of different ways.

As noted in a recent OECD discussion paper, globally, the overwhelming majority of electric vehicles are electric bikes and scooters.

Electrically-assisted bikes offer considerable advantages over other types of electric vehicles in that:

  • They are relatively cheap, thereby making them accessible to a wider range of people than electric cars/vans – and with potential social inclusion benefits (for example, they have been offered in some ‘Wheels to Work’ schemes, enabling jobseekers to take up new employment opportunities).
  • Unlike other options, they offer potential health benefits through the physical activity generated, which has been shown to be sufficient to be of value, as discussed further below.
  • They make relatively efficient use of road space, which may be particularly important in dense urban environments, where road space is constrained.

In brief, support for electrically-assisted bikes could potentially deliver excellent value for money, reaching relatively large numbers of people, and achieving economic and health benefits, in addition to environmental benefits.

It should be noted that the number of electrically-assisted bikes sold in the UK already far outstrips the number of electric cars and vans sold. In 2009, the British Electric Bike Association reported that over 15,000 units were sold in the UK. For 2011, a figure of 20,000 is quoted, and the market is thought to have expanded since that time.

The remainder of the team’s response comprises:

  • A brief definition of electrically-assisted bikes, and a short summary of their environmental and health credentials.
  • A summary of potential policy measures that could be considered.
  • A summary of some of the results from our research work, suggesting the potential of this type of transport.

To read the full response: OLEV call for evidence response – e-bikes

e-bikes in action at three events in Brighton

Brighton and Hove City Council’s Transport Planning Department are borrowing three of our electric bikes for three community events in Brighton. Members of the public will see the bikes in action and some people will have the opportunity to ride an e-bike for up to an hour in a free cycle training session with a qualified cycle trainer.

Saturday, 15th February 2014
1.00 – 5.00 pm
The Energy Café
Hollingdean Community Centre, Thompson Road, Brighton
energy cafe

Wednesday, 19th February 2014
11.00 am – 3.00 pm
The launch of a new ‘Bike Hub’
Circus Street, Brighton
brightonbikehub

Friday, 21st March 2014
4.30 – 7.00 pm
An event prior to a ‘Positive Energy’ meeting at the Centre
Hanover Community Centre, Brighton
(More information to follow.)